Kids thrive when they can make their own choices, so why not give them the chance to do so in summer camp? Steve & Kate's Camp has something for everyone, whether your kids are the next big film director, an up-and-coming fashion designer, or bound to be the best baker around. Camp starts June 11 at The Logan School in Lowry.
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Free Carnival this Saturday to support the Women's Homelessness Initiative

[ Tuesday, April 17, 2018 | 1 comments ]
Bring your friends, family, and neighbors to enjoy an evening of carnival games, face painting, balloon artist, live music, food, and fun, and all for a great cause!!

Homelessness is a huge issue in Denver and in Colorado, with around 5,000 people living on the streets at any given time in our city and around 10,000 across the state. On any given night in Denver, there are 800 women on the streets, many of whom have no place to sleep. These women are the most vulnerable to violence and abuse, yet there are few resources available to help this population. The Women's Homelessness Initiative (WHI) seeks to give these women some safety, dignity, community, and a hot meal.

WHI is a non-profit organization made up of 14 churches working through Capitol Hill United Ministries to give sanctuary and hospitality to 20 women 365 days a year. Over the past five years, the network of churches has filled more than 50,000 cots with women who most likely would be on the streets or in other very compromising situations otherwise. Everything is a volunteer effort except the laundry for the cots, which they get done with cash donations.


To learn more about the Women's Homelessness Initiative, visit http://www.chumdenver.org/womens-homelessness-intiative, or check out this recent Front Porch article about the WHI and the Carnival.

     What:  Carnival Night to benefit the Women's Homelessness Initiative (WHI) program at Park Hill UCC
     When:  Saturday, April 21, 5:00-7:30 p.m.
     Where:  Park Hill Congregational United Church of Christ, 2600 Leyden Street, Denver, CO 80207
     Cost:  FREE!*

*The event is free to the community, but we ask that you please consider bringing donations of toothbrushes, toothpaste, cough drops, tums, ear plugs, feminine products, coffee, tea, creamer, and sugar for the WHI. There will be a small charge for tickets for the carnival games and donations will be accepted for food. All monies collected will go directly to support the WHI program at Park Hill UCC.

The carnival features fun for all ages:
There will also be tons of food, all donated by:
If you would like to donate a silent auction item or volunteer at the Carnival, please email WHIdonations@gmail.com or download the submission form here:  https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zvkRmJh-LhfU1znIMEcKQM8EqlefDRCS.

Come have a great time for a great cause!


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Empower your kids to make their own choices this summer with Steve & Kate's Camp

[ Thursday, April 12, 2018 | 0 comments ]
At Steve & Kate’s they believe you need to trust kids with the freedom to make their own choices. Driven by their natural curiosity, children will experiment with their own decision-making and develop the confidence to try, fail, and learn on their own. They offer activities to inspire every child—designed by learning scientists and tested by kids, their studios offer a chance for campers to dig deep into their passions. Whether they are the next big film director, an up-and-coming fashion designer, or bound to be the best baker around, they have something for everyone.

They also believe camp should be easy for parents, so make it totally flexible. Buy any number of days (including an all-summer Membership) and show-up whenever—no need to tell them ahead of time that you’re coming. If you buy more than you need, they automatically refund back unused Day Passes in September. And with lunch and snacks provided as a part of the camp fees, you might wish they were around all year!

Dates:  Open this Summer June 11 - August 10
Ages:   Age 5 through 7th grade, with leadership opportunities for 8th & 9th graders
Where:  The Logan School for Creative Learning (in Lowry at 1005 Yosemite St, Denver, CO 80230) and 36 locations nationwide

Questions? Call Michaela! 720-439-7785 or email denver@steveandkate.com
Learn more at www.steveandkate.com Read the full story »
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Mammograms Save Lives, Maybe Yours

[ Monday, April 2, 2018 | 0 comments ]
You already know that taking care of yourself is important, but did you know that early detection could save your life? As the most common cancer among women worldwide—and the second-most common cancer overall—nearly 260,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Use the Sarah Cannon Cancer Network at HealthONE as your resource to get all your breast cancer questions answered.

What role does genetics play in breast cancer?
Your genetics and family history play an important role in your risk of getting breast cancer and can influence potential treatment options. That’s why you should always be aware of who has had cancer on both sides of your family and what age they were when they got diagnosed. Speak with one of the experienced genetic counselors at the Sarah Cannon Cancer Network at HealthONE to understand all your options related to genetic testing, screening, and treatment.

How do I lower my risk of breast cancer? 
If you have a family history of breast cancer or are worried about getting breast cancer, there are ways to reduce your risk. Along with living a healthy lifestyle, experts from HealthONE and Susan G. Komen Colorado can help you decide if medication or preventive surgery might be right for you.

What are the signs and symptoms of breast cancer?
Breast cancer symptoms can present in many ways, including lumps, areas of thickening in the breasts, or skin or nipple changes. Contact your physician right away if you experience any of these common symptoms.

Should I get a mammogram?
Because a physician might not find breast cancer on a physical exam, getting a mammogram could save your life. For women ages 40-74, Sarah Cannon recommends an annual mammogram screening. Even if you don’t have a family history of breast cancer, women should begin getting annual mammograms at age 40. Consult with your physician if you are considered high risk.

What are my treatment options?
From clinical trials to immunotherapies, the treatment options for patients with breast cancer have dramatically increased. Consult with one of the nationally regarded medical oncologists at HealthONE when considering which of the latest breast cancer treatment options are right for you.

Will I need surgery?
Patients with a breast cancer diagnosis that require surgery have a lot of exciting new treatment options, including a nipple-sparing mastectomy, breast conservation with lumpectomy and radiation, and reconstructive surgery. Consult with your doctor to see which surgical option is best for your type of breast cancer.

What should I ask my doctor after a breast cancer diagnosis?
Hearing you have breast cancer is difficult, but it doesn’t have to be a death sentence. There are some important questions to ask your doctor post diagnosis to help you feel comfortable with the care team that you have selected and next steps. Visit the Breast Cancer Q&A for a complete list of questions. Read the full story »
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Workshop Gives Help and Hope Keeping Kids Safe from Sexual Abuse

[ Thursday, March 15, 2018 | 1 comments ]
Guest post by Mindee Forman

Did you know that 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused by age 18? [ source, p. 10 ] Neither did I until I attended the Parenting Safe Children Workshop last weekend. Scary, right?

Thankfully, the workshop didn't just give me scary statistics, but left me feeling empowered and with a set of tools I can use to keep my kids safe. Presented by child sexual abuse prevention expert Feather Berkower, the workshop is presented in three parts:

  1. Educating parents about the reality and facts of child sex abuse,
     
  2. Providing tools to educate our children about body safety and help them feel empowered to say no, and
     
  3. Teaching how to build a "Prevention Team" for the child in your life, consisting of any caregivers (schools, churches, camps, etc.) and other family and friends in your kids' lives so that everyone is on the same page about body safety. We even had a chance to practice a conversation.
After attending the workshop, within 48 hours I had taken several actions and plan to take more. I already:
  
  • Filled my husband in on the workshop's content (although I would love for him to take it, too) so that we're on the same page.
     
  • Talked to my kids about a few of the body-safety rules we discussed. My son (age 5) thought the conversation was weird but listened and got it, and my daughter (age 10) was really receptive and appreciative and seemed grateful I had broached the topic.
     
  • Talked to several friends about it and encouraged them to attend (which also gave me a chance to discuss our kids' body-safety rules).
      
  • Talked to leaders at my church and school and not only encouraged them to attend the workshop (some at our school did), but to be proactive about telling parents about what they do to keep kids safe.
I plan to encourage all my kids' camps and after-school activities to also be proactive with parents about sexual abuse prevention and to let them know parents might ask about their organization's current child sexual abuse prevention policies if they haven't already. My family lives in other states for the most part, so I will need to talk to them as we're together to let them know our kids' body-safety rules and ask them to join our team. I bought Feather's handy Conversation Starter Cards to help me with this since it's not a natural or easy conversation for me.

The whole goal of the workshop and Feather's research is to normalize the conversation around sexual abuse so that it becomes as common as buckling kids into a car seat or having them wear a bike helmet. If we can all take such action as a community, our kids will be far less likely to experience life-changing, traumatic sexual abuse.

If you haven't yet taken the workshop, there are several upcoming opportunities in Denver, some that even offer childcare. There's one on April 14 in Stapleton, but if other dates/times/areas work better for you or your family, here are a few upcoming options (check Feather's website for full schedule):
  
  1. March 17 at 1:00 p.m. in Bonnie Brae (with free childcare)
  2. April 7 at 1:00 p.m. in Englewood
  3. April 14 at 10:00 a.m. in Stapleton (childcare available)
  4. April 22 at 1:00 p.m. in Boulder
  5. April 28 at 1:00 p.m. in Carbondale (childcare available)
  6. May 5 at 9:30 a.m. in Denver (Wellshire S of Yale @ University - childcare available)
  7. May 12 at 10:00 a.m. in Lakewood
April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, so it's a great time to learn about this important topic and how we can keep kids safe!

If you live outside the Denver area, Feather also offers an online version of her workshop - visit her website for details or to register.

If you would rather not be part of a big group or have a specific situation that concerns you, Feather does offer one-on-one phone consultations as well.

If you have taken her workshop and want additional resources, check out Feather's book, recommended resources, or blog (I just subscribed to updates - it's great stuff). Encourage your friends to take the workshop. Talk to your caregivers. Check and share out this news story about Feather, her workshop, and keeping kids safe:


Yes, it's an uncomfortable topic. But if I'm not willing to be uncomfortable to keep my kids safe, I'm not doing my job as a parent. Will you join me? If we normalize this conversation, together we will all feel less uncomfortable, and our kids will be far safer.



Guest post by Mindee Forman

Mindee is a freelance writer, editor, web designer, and social media consultant. She lives in Denver with her husband, two kids, and two crazy cats. Read the full story »
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Free Parents Night Out for Stapleton Families

[ Tuesday, March 6, 2018 | 0 comments ]

Micah Martin, owner of Stapleton Family Karate in Northfield and a Stapleton resident and father of three young kids, wants to say thank you to our Stapleton Community by giving local parents a break!

For the next several weeks on select Saturday and Sunday evenings he will offer a FREE Parents' Night Out to Stapleton residents! For three hours, your kids (age 4+) will play games, have fun, learn a little karate and some life skills, and eat pizza,  all run by Micah and his team of professional instructors at Stapleton Family Karate. Normally these events are $25 per kid, so this exciting!

Dates between March 11 and March 31 are currently available - sign up at http://thankyoustapletonparents.com/. Each Parents' Night Out runs from 5:00-8:00 p.m. and has no strings attached. It's totally free as Micah's gift to our community. Hear more from him:

 
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